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Latin American Art Center founded by Linda Grandia

Linda Grandia

Linda Grandia at the opening of the Cultural Center for Latin American Art.

Initiator and former Miss Holland Linda Grandia inaugurated the center in 2011 with a collection of modern Latin American art.

Linda Grandia has been a full-time Senior Sales Manager for diverse international clothing brands until she decided to start her own company. Linda enjoys art, singing and is trained at the royal conservatory of The Hague as a classical ballet dancer and has a heart felt passion for Latin Music and Dance.

Throughout the 20th century many Latin American artists had become expatriates in Paris, New York, and elsewhere in search of artistic stimulus, better economic prospects, and political stability. However, with the return of democracy to countries such as Argentina and Brazil and the successful transfer of power to civilian rule in other countries, Latin America began to retain more artists and provide more economic opportunities.

By 2000 Buenos Aires housed more than 60 contemporary art galleries as well as Latin America’s leading auction market, held in the municipal pawn shop. Moreover, major New York auction houses devoted entire sessions to modern Latin American art, signaling the rising importance of this area in the international marketplace. At the turn of the 21st century, as the international art world focused on the social and political issues that had long occupied artists from the region, Latin American art increasingly gained a prominent place in the global discourse about art and its role in society.

Latin American artists also used video, an emerging international medium, to address political concerns. After moving to New York City, the Chilean artist Alfredo Jaar in 1987 used a computerized light board over Times Square to confront viewers with his message; he superimposed the statement “This is not America” on a map of the United States. When the image electronically changed, the word America was superimposed on a map of the whole Western hemisphere. Remaining in New York even after the return of democracy in Chile, Jaar expanded his scope to dramatize abuses worldwide, such as experiences of Haitian boat people or the indifference of the mass media toward the genocide in Rwanda. These works were installed in museum settings.

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